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Elery Hamilton-Smith

Elery Hamilton-Smith

Angela Hamilton-Smith mailed the photo to TASA in 2014. The photo was taken of Elery on November 20, 1996.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elery Hamilton-Smith (born 28 December 1929) is a retired Australian interdisciplinary scholar and academic, latterly adjunct professor of Environmental Studies at Charles Sturt University.

Dr. Hamilton-Smith worked in teaching and community services (1949-68) social policy & Planning Consultant (1969-77). He developed a plan for education of recreation and leisure workers and helped establish courses in 6 universities (1974). He was appointed lecturer and continued as Professor and Head of School in Social Policy and Community Services (1969-95). His career over this period included wide-ranging research and consultation often centred upon leisure policies and programs. He undertook various national policy development studies, visiting professorships, Educational Fellowship with Government of Canada, work with UNESCO, WLRA Centre of Excellence (Wageningen), and Benefits of Leisure studies with the US Forest Service. In the 1990s Dr. Hamilton-Smith moved progressively from his interest in outdoor recreation into examining issues of sustainability and environmental studies; accepted a chair in environmental studies and worked as an advisor with both IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature and the UNESCO World Heritage Bureau. In 2010, he handed these responsibilities over to a former post-graduate student and has since been working on cataloguing and transferring his collections of books, papers, ephemera, photographs, maps etc. (over one million items) to the National Museum of Australia. Dr. Hamilton-Smith published over 2,000 books, reports and papers and worked in 50 countries.

Elery Hamilton-Smith contributed to Nexus in 2009 with his articles Sharing power in environmental management and Amy Wheaton – A Pioneer Australian Sociologist.

Elery passed away on June 27, 2015.  Vale: Elery Hamilton-Smith, founding father of Australian leisure studies.