Top Menu

Doing Gender: Relationships, Emotions and Spaces of Learning

Monday, August 13th, Deakin Downtown, 9.30-2.30pm
Conveners: Amanda Keddie (Deakin University) and Garth Stahl (University of South Australia)
Sponsor: Deakin Research for Educational Impact (REDI)

REGISTER

Research in sociology of education has long engaged with the contentious terrain of social justice.

In designing our research, many of us continue to grapple with questions of gender, subjectivity and emotions. Furthermore, these questions keep changing in response to an ever-shifting economic, cultural and political landscape that is creating new and rearticulating old equity challenges. How are these challenges playing out in formal and alternative/informal sites of learning? And how can we build on the strong and robust history of education research in this area to respond to these new challenges?

After an evacuation of gender in equity and schooling policy in Australia from the mid-1990s, we are currently experiencing somewhat of a renaissance in a focus on gender in schools – albeit a highly contentious one with familiar conservative backlash politics (especially associated with the Safe Schools program) stifling the equity agenda. Such conditions point to the continued imperative of rethinking how we are researching gender, emotions and schooling.

The one-day symposium is focused on discussing previous and current research on emotions and gender which inform our thinking about young people’s experiences with learning today. Emotions arise out of particular investments in particular ideologies and politics and they work in relation to desire, envy, aspiration and fear.  The symposium is envisaged not so much as a discussion of findings but rather a reflection on how the relationship between gender and emotions is being researched and specifically what approaches and methodologies are being employed.

Questions to be explored may include, but are not limited to:

  • How are we approaching the ways in which we research the relationship between gender and emotion in spaces of learning, teaching and management today?
  • How might we think through established sociological axes of inequality in designing research which reflects a more cohesive account of contemporary articulations of gender and relationships?
  • What are the new questions of gender, subjectivity and emotions for schools in the time of the #MeToo movement? Is it simply same old, same old?
  • How can our new theoretical (feminist) toolbox better theorise these new questions?
  • What can we learn from where we have been to theorise these new questions of gender, subjectivity and emotions?
  • How do certain methods lend themselves to particular types of knowledge, potentially recreating old structures and/or enabling new ones?
  • What might be the implications of these questions for both academic knowledge, as well as knowledge which has public impact in the current political landscape?

Format

9.30 – 10  Opening Address

Jill Blackmore (Deakin University)

10-11 – Panel 1 Provocations

  • What can we learn from where we have been to theorise these new questions of gender, subjectivity and emotions?
  • What are the new questions of gender, subjectivity and emotions for schools in the time of the #MeToo movement? Is it simply same old, same old?
  • How can our new theoretical (feminist) toolbox better theorise these new questions?

 

Panel 1 Speakers (speakers provide a commentary on their choice of the Panel 1 provocations for 10 minutes each, followed by a 10 minute wrap up by the discussant)

Penny Jane Burke (University of Newcastle) and Matt Lumb (University of Newcastle)

Ian Davis (Queensland University of Technology)

Julie McLeod (University of Melbourne)

 

Panel 1 – Discussant Chris Hickey (Deakin University)

11-11.30 – Q & A facilitated by Amanda Keddie

11.30-12.30 – Early Lunch

12.30-1.30 – Panel 2 Provocations

  • How are we approaching how we research the relationship between gender and emotion in spaces of learning today?
  • How do certain methods lend themselves to particular types of knowledge, potentially recreating old structures and/or enabling new ones?
  • What might be the implications of these questions for both academic knowledge, as well as knowledge which has public impact in the current political landscape?

 

Panel 2 Speakers (speakers provide a commentary on their choice of the Panel 2 provocations for 10 minutes each, followed by a 10 minute wrap up by the discussant)

Laura Scholes (Queensland University of Technology)

Dorte Marie Søndergaard (Aarhus University)

Claire Charles (Deakin University)

Amanda Mooney (Deakin University)

 

Panel 2 – Discussant: Leanne Higham (University of Melbourne)

1.30-2 – Q & A facilitated by Garth Stahl

2-2.30 – Closing Address: Jane Kenway (Monash University)

REGISTER