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Archive | Informed News & Analysis by TASA members

Domestic abuse or genuine relationship? Our welfare system can’t tell

Financial abuse can be misinterpreted as ‘sharing finances’, which can indicate a relationship in the criteria of the couple rule. Shutterstock Lyndal Sleep, Griffith University In Australia’s social security laws, the “couple rule” is used to determine if a person is in a relationship, tying access to Centrelink payments to the income and assets of […]

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June wrap-up: Public output by TASA members

Informed News & Analysis Julie Lawson, Jago Dodson, Kathleen Flanagan, Keith Jacobs, Laurence Troy, Ryan van den Nouwelant (June 26, 2019) Australia’s social housing policy needs stronger leadership and an investment overhaul. The Conversation.  Kellie Bousfield (June 20, 2019) NSW budget: giving schools extra money only if they meet ‘outcomes’ can hamper teaching standards. The Conversation.  Nicholas Hookway (June 20, 2019) Business […]

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Australia’s social housing policy needs stronger leadership and an investment overhaul

Energy efficient social housing in Tasmania. Xsquared, Hobart, Author provided Julie Lawson, RMIT University; Jago Dodson, RMIT University; Kathleen Flanagan, University of Tasmania; Keith Jacobs, University of Tasmania; Laurence Troy, UNSW, and Ryan van den Nouwelant, Western Sydney University Australia will need another 730,000 social housing dwellings in 20 years if it is to tackle […]

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‘I really have thought this can’t go on’: loneliness looms for rising numbers of older private renters

People living in private rental housing were much more likely than social housing residents to say they felt lonely. Dundanim/Shutterstock Alan Morris, University of Technology Sydney and Andrea Verdasco, University of Technology Sydney Loneliness is increasingly recognised worldwide as a critical social issue and one of the major health hazards of our time. Our research […]

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May wrap-up: Public output by TASA members

Informed News & Analysis Peter “PJ” Holtum & Greg Marston (May 24, 2019) Uber drivers’ experience highlights the dead-end job prospects facing more Australian workers. The Conversation.  Elizabeth Humphrys (May 17, 2019) Hawke’s Complicated Legacy, on An Integral State: https://anintegralstate.net/2019/05/17/hawkes-complicated-legacy/ Elizabeth Humphrys (May 20, 2019) We Live in Anti-political Times, at Overland Journal: https://overland.org.au/2019/05/we-live-in-anti-political-times/ Sarah Wendt, Kate Seymour & Kristin Natalier (May 16, 2019) An innovative way to counter […]

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April wrap-up: Public output by TASA members

Informed News & Analysis Majdi Faleh, Andrea Cook, Ashleigh Haw & Sandra Carrasco (April 18, 2019) Paris? Melbourne? Public housing doesn’t just look the same, it’s part of the challenges refugees face. The Conversation.  Zoei Sutton,  ‘Change One Thing’ to support casual staff. NTEU ADVOCATE. vol. 26 no. 1, April 2019, p.13. Zareh Ghazarian, Jacqueline Laughland-Booy & Zlatko Skrbis (April 18, 2019) New research […]

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March wrap-up: Public output by TASA members

Informed News & Analysis Jessica Richards, Eric Anderson & Keith D. Parry (1 March, 2019)Rugby league may finally have reached its tipping point on player behaviour and violence. The Conversation.  Stewart Lockie (1 March, 2019) People and issues outside our big cities are diverse, but these priorities stand out. The Conversation.  Na’ama Carlin (March 18, 2019) What I learned from my year […]

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Young voters may hold the key to the NSW state election: here’s why

Students march through the University of NSW in Sydney calling on the university to divest from fossil fuels. AAP/Danny Casey Philippa Collin, Western Sydney University Young Australians are more connected, educated and informed than previous generations. They are also more likely to have higher debt and less economic independence into their 30s. Many feel excluded […]

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If you’ve got private health insurance, the choice to use it in a public hospital is your own

When you’re admitted to a public hospital, they’ll want to know if you have private health insurance. From shutterstock.com Sophie Lewis, UNSW; Karen Willis, La Trobe University, and Rebecca E. Olson, The University of Queensland You arrive at your local public hospital for treatment. The hospital staff ask for your name, date of birth and […]

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February wrap-up: Public output by TASA members

Informed News & Analysis Kathleen Flanagan, Chris Martin, Julie Lawson & Keith Jacobs (February 6, 2019) Is social housing essential infrastructure? How we think about it does matter. The Conversation.  Natalier, K. (2019). Australia’s Child Support System Facilitates Economic Abuse. Power to Persuade. Waling, A. (2019). Fear of discrimination stops LGBTI Australians from seeking mental health support. Star Observer.  Waling, A. (2019). Better supporting LGBTI people […]

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Choosing a career? These jobs won’t go out of style

Careers in health care, education and design are unlikely to be automated. www.shutterstock.com Lisa Denny, University of Tasmania Sensationalist claims that 40% of jobs in Australia won’t exist in the future are unhelpful for young Australians thinking about entering the workforce. The reality is some jobs will no longer exist, new jobs will be created […]

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January wrap-up: Public output by TASA members

Informed News & Analysis Rachel Busbridge & Mark Chou (January 16, 2019) Forcing Australia Day citizenship ceremonies on councils won’t make the issue go away. The Conversation. Helen Forbes-Mewett (January 15, 2019) was on SBS news on Tuesday, described as a sociologist, commenting on international student mental health following a coroners report that had drawn on Helen’s work.  To […]

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The far-right may think they own ‘nationalism’, but we can reclaim it as a force for good

Rachel Busbridge, Australian Catholic University We see the word “nationalism” as problematic. The weekend rally on St Kilda beach, organised by far-right activist Neil Erikson, reminds us nationalism is the territory of fringe groups who hold bigoted views, particularly towards people who aren’t “white”. Nationalism means: Identification with one’s own nation and support for its […]

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Forcing Australia Day citizenship ceremonies on councils won’t make the issue go away

The Australia Day debate will likely become more pronounced each year. from shutterstock.com Rachel Busbridge, Australian Catholic University and Mark Chou, Australian Catholic University In the latest instalment of the culture wars surrounding Australia Day, Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Sunday said he plans to force councils to hold citizenship ceremonies on January 26. The […]

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December wrap-up: Public output by TASA members

Informed News & Analysis Lawrie Zion, Andrew Dodd, Matthew Ricketson, Merryn Sherwood, Monika Winarnita, Penny O’Donnell & Timothy Marjoribanks (5 December, 2018) New research reveals how Australian journalists are faring four years after redundancy. The Conversation.  Aleesha Rodriguez (30 November, 2018) Happy birthday, SA’s big battery, and many happy returns (of your recyclable parts). The Conversation.  Sue Malta, Jane Hocking, Meredith Temple-Smith, Christina […]

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November wrap-up: Public output by TASA members

Informed News & Analysis Julie Henderson & Eileen Willis (25 October, 2018) Want to improve care in nursing homes? Mandate minimum staffing levels. The Conversation.  Jessica Richards et al. (7 November, 2018) Note to governments: sports stadiums should benefit everyone, not just fans. The Conversation.  Brendan Churchill (4 November, 2018) Financial crisis hit young men hard – and they’re yet to recover. Sydney Morning Herald.  […]

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October wrap-up: Public output by TASA members

Informed News & Analysis Christopher Mayes (23 October, 2018) Is eating a settler-colonial act? Food justice and Indigenous sovereignty. ABC Religion.  Andrew Clarke & Cameron Parsell (22 October, 2018) Turning ‘big brother’ surveillance into a helping hand to the homeless. The Conversation.  Meredith Nash & Robyn Moore (2018) Are Leadership Styles in STEMM Gendered?. Association for Women in Science (page 8). Michelle Peterie […]

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‘Walking into a headwind’ – what it feels like for women building science careers

The culture of science is premised on the idea that there are no barriers; that everybody is treated equally as long as they put in the effort. from www.shutterstock.com Robyn Moore, University of Tasmania and Meredith Nash, University of Tasmania Australia’s parliament has a problem retaining experienced women. As a workplace, it’s not alone. Women […]

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New research shows Australian teens have complex views on religion and spirituality

Researchers have identified six broad groups of young people categorised by their views on religion and spirituality. Shutterstock Andrew Singleton, Deakin University; Anna Halafoff, Deakin University; Gary D Bouma, Monash University, and Mary Lou Rasmussen, Australian National University The 2016 Census suggested about a third of Australian teens had no religion. But ask a teenager […]

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August wrap-up: Public output by TASA members

Informed News & Analysis Steve O’Brien (July 25, 2018). Going backwards is the new going forward. The Herald.  Karen Soldatic (July 26, 2018), New report brings Sri Lankan women living with a disability ‘Out of the Shadows‘. Western Sydney University News Centre. TASA 2018 (2018). Why are so many academic conferences hostile to women? The Guardian Leah Ruppanner & Brendan Churchill (August 6, […]

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Sorry, men, there’s no such thing as ‘dirt blindness’ – you just need to do more housework

While the gender gap is narrowing, women still do seven hours more housework per week than men (and that doesn’t include the child-caring). Shutterstock Leah Ruppanner, University of Melbourne and Brendan Churchill, University of Melbourne The problem with housework is that it is never-ending drudgery. As soon as the floor is cleaned, the dog throws […]

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Angela Williamson’s sacking shows gulf between Cricket Australia’s words and deeds

Angela Williamson was sacked by Cricket Australia because of tweets criticising Tasmanian government policy. Twitter/Peter Mathew David Rowe, Western Sydney University Cricket Australia’s dismissal of a top Tasmanian cricketing official for “making offensive comments” has received enormous media attention in Australia and overseas. (more…)

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A very public sociology

Joseph Borlagdan, Brotherhood of St Laurence, University of Melbourne, TASA member While there are a few exceptions, it’s rare to see Australian sociologists featured as talking heads on our television screens. TASA member Catherine Robinson chats with us about co-hosting and consulting on the SBS documentary ‘Filthy Rich and Homeless’. She reflects upon how the […]

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July wrap-up: Public output by TASA members

Informed News & Analysis Alexandra Wong, David Rowe & Teresa Swist (June 28, 2018). Sydney artists are being priced out of the city – here’s how to bring them back. The Conversation.  Dina Bowman (July 2, 2018). Employment services aren’t working for older jobseekers, jobactive staff or employers. The Conversation. Michael Gilding, Dean Lusher & Helen Bird (July 12, […]

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Angela Williamson’s sacking shows gulf between Cricket Australia’s words and deeds

Angela Williamson was sacked by Cricket Australia because of tweets criticising Tasmanian government policy. Twitter/Peter Mathew David Rowe, Western Sydney University Cricket Australia’s dismissal of a top Tasmanian cricketing official for “making offensive comments” has received enormous media attention in Australia and overseas. In its letter to terminate the employment of Public Policy and Government […]

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June wrap-up: Public output by TASA members

Informed News & Analysis Kristin Natalier. (June 5, 2018). What does ‘home’ mean for children whose parents have separated? Centre for Research on Families and Relationships Michael Walsh. (May 28, 2018). ‘The Interaction Order and Musical Sound: Shopping with Erving Goffman. The Sociological Inquiry Bridges, Donna, Krivokapic-Skoko, Branka., Wulff, Elizabeth., Bamberry, Larissa. & Jenkins, Stacey. (June 1, 2018). The female tradie shortage: why […]

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Data ethics is more than just what we do with data, it’s also about who’s doing it

Power over business, democracy and education will likely continue to lie with data and data-dependent tools, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence. Shutterstock James Arvanitakis, Western Sydney University; Andrew Francis, Western Sydney University, and Oliver Obst, Western Sydney University If the recent Cambridge Analytica data scandal has taught us anything, it’s that the ethical […]

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Why stereotypes of sexy women fans persist at the World Cup

Kim Toffoletti, Deakin University This article is part of a World Cup series exploring the politics, economics, science and social issues behind the world’s most popular sports event. Globally, women’s football fandom is on the rise, with women comprising around 40% of worldwide television audiences for the 2014 men’s football World Cup. Couple this with […]

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May wrap-up: Public output by TASA members

Informed News & Analysis Amanda Wise, Kristine Aquino & colleagues (April 30, 2018). Pushing casual sport to the margins threatens cities’ social cohesion. The Conversation Donna Bridges & Ben Wadham (April 23, 2018). Media reporting on women in the military is preserving a male dominated culture. The Conversation.  Marcus Maloney, ‘Jordan Peterson: The battle for the hearts and minds of young […]

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How Indonesia is dealing with the new threat posed by returning Islamic State fighters

TASA member Joshua Roose, Australian Catholic University It was no coincidence that Sunday’s suicide attacks on three Catholic churches in Indonesia came as Muslims began the holy month of Ramadan. For the observant, this is a time of charity, introspection, renewal and closeness to God. For Islamic State, however, Ramadan has become a strategic time […]

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April wrap-up: Public output by TASA members

Informed News & Analysis Scott Doidge, ‘Friday essay: the politics of the US family sitcom, and why Roseanne rocks.’ The Conversation Lisa Denny, ‘Migration is slowing Australia’s rate of ageing, but not necessarily in the regions.’ The Conversation Riaz Hassan,  ‘The UAE’s Unsustainable Nation Building​’, YaleGlobal, April 24, 2018 Jack Hynes & Ramon Spaaij, ‘Commonwealth Games injuries highlight a problematic culture […]

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Friday essay: the politics of the US family sitcom, and why Roseanne rocks

Popular sitcoms like Modern Family avoid reflecting on wider economic realities: Roseanne has filled a void. IMDB Scott Doidge, University of Melbourne After a 20-year hiatus, the American TV series Roseanne has returned to television. Early indications suggest that the reboot will be an enormous success, with the first episodes delivering the highest ratings for […]

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March wrap-up: Public output by TASA members

Informed News & Analysis Sophie Lewis & Karen Willis, ‘Do you really need private health insurance? Here’s what you need to know before deciding. The Conversation Alan Morris, ‘Mission nearly impossible: the City of Sydney’s efforts to increase the affordable housing supply‘. The Conversation Ben Wadham, ‘Hazing and sexual violence in Australian universities: we need to address men’s cultures, The Conversation […]

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Hazing and sexual violence in Australian universities: we need to address men’s cultures

Brotherhood is produced by men with a sense of licence and tradition, and is sustained through particular rites of passage and rituals of abuse. Shutterstock Ben Wadham, Flinders University The esteemed residential colleges of Sydney University have recently gained intense public scrutiny for fostering cultures of sexual harassment, rape and hazing. The Red Zone Report, […]

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February wrap-up: Public output by TASA members

Blogs Janine Pickering: Award-winning Swinburne thesis explores gender in STEM management Roger Patulny, ‘All the Lonely People‘ Kim Toffoletti, ‘From sport widows to sport fans: research tracks evolution of women supporters‘ Alexia Maddox, ‘A Digital Bermuda Triangle: The Perils of Doing Ethnography on Darknet Drug Markets‘ Crystal Abidin, ‘Elderly Influencers in East Asia, Cyborgology (more…)

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January wrap-up: Public output by TASA members

Informed News & Analysis John Scott: Male sex workers catering to more women and couples, as legal reform lags, ABC News Brendan Churchill: Mum, dad and two kids no longer the norm in the changing Australian family, The Conversation David Rowe & colleague: The Winter Olympics and the two Koreas: how sport diplomacy could save the world. The Conversation Andrew Glover: Sustainable […]

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First reconciliation, then a republic – starting with changing the date of Australia Day

Changing the date of Australia Day is the first tiny step for Australia to begin the reckoning with its origins. AAP/Dan Peled Maggie Walter, University of Tasmania As the debate continues over whether Australia Day should be celebrated on January 26, this series looks at the politics of some unresolved issues swirling around Australia Day […]

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December wrap-up: Public output by TASA members

Informed News & Analysis Shane Duggan: So you’ve got your ATAR, now what? Here are some options, The Conversation Rebecca Pearse: The federal Climate Policy Review: a recipe for business as usual, The Conversation Deborah Lupton: The social factors that influence whether you’ll use your wearable device, The Conversation Dina Bowman & Marcus Banks: People on low incomes are sacrificing basic goods to take out insurance, The […]

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Facebook’s new Messenger Kids app could be good for digital literacy

Facebook’s Messenger Kids has sparked debate about what age children should be using messaging apps. Shutterstock.com Philippa Collin, Western Sydney University Facebook is trialling a new Messenger Kids app in the United States. The standalone app is aimed at under-13s, who aren’t currently eligible for a normal Facebook account. Parents are responsible for setting up […]

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Schools are not adequately preparing young Australians to participate in our democracy

As young Australians approach voting age they need simple, clear and practical instructions about the mechanics of how government works and how to vote. Shutterstock Zareh Ghazarian, Monash University; Jacqueline Laughland-Booy, Monash University, and Zlatko Skrbis, Monash University Australia’s youth are interested in politics and are passionate about issues but, unless we take note of […]

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November wrap-up: Public output by TASA members

Informed News & Analysis Alan Morris: Last of the Millers Point and Sirius tenants hang on as the money now pours in, The Conversation James Arvanitakis: Same Sex Marriage Postal Survey, ABC News Breakfast Rob White: Criminality and Climate Change, University of Tasmania Peter Robinson: Gay rebels: why some older homosexual men don’t support same-sex marriage, The Conversation Michael Flood: Do parents of boys view […]

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Last of the Millers Point and Sirius tenants hang on as the money now pours in

Alan Morris, University of Technology Sydney The Millers Point and Sirius building tenants’ long, hard struggle against eviction from their inner Sydney community is reaching a critical point. On September 21, Housing NSW provided the following statistics to the Millers Point Estates Advisory Board: only seven residents in four tenancies have yet to commit to […]

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Here’s how Australia can act to target racist behaviour online

Racists take advantage of social media algorithms to find people with similar beliefs. from www.shutterstock.com Andrew Jakubowicz, University of Technology Sydney Although racism online feels like an insurmountable problem, there are legal and civil actions we can take right now in Australia to address it. Racism expressed on social media sites provided by Facebook and […]

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September wrap-up: Public output by TASA members

Informed News & Analysis Jennifer Power: FactCheck: are children ‘better off’ with a mother and father than withsame-sex parents? The Conversation Steve Matthewman: Sociology from Aotearoa New Zealand: Power Politics in Post-Disaster Ōtautahi, Global Dialogue Holly Thorpe: Sociology from Aotearoa New Zealand: Creative Sports in Post-Disaster Geographies, Global Dialogue Robert Webb: Sociology from Aotearoa New Zealand: Towards an Indigenous Criminology, Global Dialogue Steve Matthewman […]

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Young Australians are engaged in political issues, but unsure how democracy works

Research shows young people are passionate about issues like marriage equality, but many do not understand how governments are formed and prime ministers elected. Shutterstock Zareh Ghazarian, Monash University; Jacqueline Laughland-Booy, Monash University, and Zlatko Skrbis, Monash University The importance of Australians having the knowledge and skills to participate as active citizens is always a […]

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August wrap-up: articles/papers/reports/reviews by TASA members

Collyer, F.M.; Willis, K. and Lewis, S. (2017) ‘Gatekeepers in the Healthcare Sector: Knowledge and Bourdieu’s Concept of Field’ Social Science and Medicine 186: 96-103. Connell, R.; Pearse, R.; Collyer, F.M.; Maia, J. and Morrell, R. (2017) ‘Negotiating with the North: How Southern-tier Intellectual Workers Deal With the Global Economy of Knowledge’ The Sociological Review. DOI: 10.1177/0038026117705038  p. 1–17. Hughes, K.  (2017). Transition pedagogies and the neoliberal […]

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July wrap up: Informed News & Analysis by TASA members

Catherine Robinson: Homelessness: The real housing crisis gripping Australia, SBS Catherine Robinson: Comment: Why ‘Filthy Rich & Homeless’ enables the homeless to tell their own stories, SBS Judy Rose: Can a shorter work week help work-life balance? CPA Australia Kate Fitz-Gibbon, JaneMaree Maher & Jude McCulloch: Long ignored, adolescent family violence needs our attention, The Conversation Dan Woodman: There is no boomers v millennials generational war […]

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Why are there so few women screen composers?

Lisa Gerrard performing in Budapest, 2012. She is one of Australia’s few successful female composers for screen. Balazs Mohai/EPA Catherine Strong, RMIT University Just 13% of those composing music for screen are women, according to membership figures from APRA AMCOS, the organisation that looks after copyright for songwriters, composers and music publishers in Australia. Female […]

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Downsizing cost trap awaits retirees – five reasons to be wary

Add up all the neglected costs of downsizing and retirees have good reason to be wary of making the move. wavebreakmedia from www.shutterstock.com Erika Altmann, University of Tasmania It’s time to debunk the myth of zero housing costs in retirement if we want to understand why retirees resist downsizing. Retirees have at least five reasons […]

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Universities have a problem with sexual assault and harassment: here’s how to fix it

University students need more, and better, education in sexual violence prevention strategies. Shutterstock Michael Flood, Queensland University of Technology Universities in Australia have a serious problem with sexual assault and sexual harassment. The Australian Human Rights Commission’s survey, released today, documents that large numbers of students have experienced sexual assault and harassment. This is no […]

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June wrap up: Informed News & Analysis by TASA members

Karen Fisher & Sally Robinson: Census shows increase in children with disability, but even more are still uncounted, The Conversation Gary Bouma: Census 2016 shows Australia’s changing religious profile, with more ‘nones’ than Catholics, The Conversation Kate Huppatz, Shanthi Robertson , Adam Possamai & James Arvanitakis: Western Sydney University experts weigh-in on the 2016 Census, Western Sydney University News Centre Dan Woodman: Don’t […]

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Blaming migrants won’t solve Western Sydney’s growing pains

Many people in culturally diverse populations in Western Sydney have lived in Australia for many years, if not several generations. Shutterstock Shanthi Robertson, Western Sydney University and Kristine Aquino, University of Technology Sydney Population growth has profound impacts on Australian life, and sorting myths from facts can be difficult. This article is part of our […]

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From Boomers to Xennials: we love talking about our generations, but must recognise their limits

Do you remember these? Shutterstock.com Dan Woodman, University of Melbourne We all know the names: Boomers, Gen X and Millennials. Now we can add the “Xennials”, a cross-over generation between X-ers and Millennials that recently took the internet by storm. The “Xennials” are supposedly a group born between the late 1970s and early 1980s who […]

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Census 2016 shows Australia’s changing religious profile, with more ‘nones’ than Catholics

The 2016 Census showed major changes in the ranking order of religious groups in Australia. AAP/Tracey Nearmy Gary D Bouma, Monash University Every five years the census asks Australians: “What is your religion?”. Ten tick-box responses are provided, along with the option to write in some other response. In 2016 Census, the first box was […]

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Census shows increase in children with disability, but even more are still uncounted

Some people with disabilities may not require government supports, meaning they wouldn’t have been counted as having a disability in the Census. from www.shutterstock.com.au Karen R Fisher, UNSW and Sally Robinson, Southern Cross University The 2016 Census has revealed an increase in the number of children with disability, up nearly 40,000 since 2011. One explanation […]

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Long ignored, adolescent family violence needs our attention

Adolescent family violence has detrimental effects on the health and wellbeing of families, and is surrounded by stigma and shame. shutterstock Kate Fitz-Gibbon, Monash University; JaneMaree Maher, Monash University, and Jude McCulloch, Monash University Family violence and youth justice have been subjected to an intense focus in Australia in the past year. Reviews have revealed […]

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Free textbooks for first-year university students could help improve retention rates

Textbooks can be costly. from shutterstock.com James Arvanitakis, Western Sydney University Despite 20 years of focus on improving university retention rates, we are still losing one in five of our first-year students. And the release of a new report by TEQSA again reminds us of the challenges of retention. The report highlights that, on average, universities […]

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History textbooks still imply that Australians are white

Who is portrayed as Australian? ‘Opening of the first parliament’ Tom Roberts c.1903. Wikipedia Robyn Moore, University of Tasmania In this series, we’ll discuss whether progress is being made on Indigenous education, looking at various areas including policy, scholarships, school leadership, literacy and much more. Despite improvements to their content over time, secondary school history […]

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Sydney public housing evictions a policy success? Only if you ignore the high human cost

Alan Morris, University of Technology Sydney Three years after New South Wales’ housing minister announced that all 579 public housing tenants in Millers Point, Dawes Point and the Sirius Building would be moved within two years and their homes sold, only 24 tenants are still resisting the move. So far, 151 properties have been sold […]

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May wrap up: Informed News Analysis & Commentary by TASA members

David Rowe: For cities, hosting major sporting events is a double-edged sword, The Conversation Ben Spies-Butcher et al.:The strange accounting behind the proposed HECS changes, The Conversation Ben Spies-Butcher et al.:Budget 2017-18 brings welfare crackdown and increased defence and security funding: experts respond, The Conversation Erika Altmann: Why Chinese investors find Australian real estate so alluring, The Conversation Deborah Lupton: The ABC’s […]

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You should care about your doctor’s health, because it matters to yours

We tend to consider certain people or roles as privileged and resilient. from shutterstock.com Alex Broom, UNSW Doctors’ health tends to be broadly high compared to the general population. This is expected given their relative privilege. Health operates according to a social gradient – those with more, say, money and education, generally do better and […]

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Anti-siphoning changes a blow to sports fans who want to watch on free-to-air TV

Controversies over sport, gambling and TV have tended to overshadow changes to the anti-siphoning scheme. AAP/Julian Smith David Rowe, Western Sydney University Sport features heavily in the federal government’s long-anticipated Broadcast and Content Reform Package. The package demonstrates the deep connection between sport and TV, as well as the prominent place of sport in Australian […]

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Catholic schools’ ‘alternative’ to Safe Schools isn’t all that alternative

Some in the Catholic community previously labeled the Safe Schools program as ‘controversial’. Mal Fairclough/AAP Lucy Nicholas, Swinburne University of Technology A Catholic school network’s launch of an “alternative” to Safe Schools Coalition – an anti-bullying program – is based on the same research and approaches. This alternative program bears remarkable similarities in both its […]

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April wrap up: Informed News Analysis & Commentary by TASA members

Kate Fitz-Gibbon, JaneMaree Maher, Jude McCulloch & Sandra Walklate: Victoria leads the way on family violence, but Canberra needs to lift its game, The Conversation Gary D Bouma: How religion rises – and falls – in modern Australia, The Conversation Brad West: How a more divided Turkey could change the way we think about Gallipoli, The Conversation Michael Gilding: When a […]

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How religion rises – and falls – in modern Australia

Younger Australians seem particularly inclined to say they have ‘no religion’. Shutterstock Gary D Bouma, Monash University In the past 50 years, the nature and shape of religion in Australia has changed dramatically. While secularisation and religious decline was one way of telling this story, it has become increasingly unsatisfactory. Religion has not gone away, […]

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March wrap up: Informed News Analysis & Commentary by TASA members

Kate Fitz-Gibbon, JaneMaree Maher, Jude McCulloch & Sandra Walklate: Victoria leads the way on family violence, but Canberra needs to lift its game, The Conversation Paul Henman: After the robo-debt debacle, here’s how Centrelink can win back Australians’ trust, The Conversation Cathering Strong & Emma Rush: How do you remember a rock god? The complicated legacy of Chuck Berry, The Conversation Nick […]

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February wrap up: Informed News & Analysis by TASA members

Andrew Jakubowicz, et al.: Australians believe 18C protections should stay, The Conversation  Marcus Maloney & Steve Roberts: PewDiePie, new media stars and the court of public opinion, The Conversation  David Rowe: Prize fight over live-streamed sport will go on long after the final bell sounds,The Conversation Karen Fisher: Shared ownership can help make housing affordable for people with disability, The Conversation Karen Willis & Sophie Lewis: Increased […]

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