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Breaking up is hard to do: how the ALP can differ from the Greens

Gary Wickham, Murdoch University It’s both heartening and perplexing to read in the press about the ALP’s increasing determination, in the wake of the NSW election result, to make clear to voters that Labor is not allied to the Greens. It’s heartening because it has become obvious since its 2010-13 “fling” with the Greens that […]

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Book Review Invitation – HSR

The Editors of Health Sociology Review invite reviews of the following books. Accepted reviews will be published in the journal and reviewers get to keep a copy of the book.  If you would like to enquire about reviewing a book please contact Dr Sarah MacLean on (03) 90353114, or smaclean@unimelb.edu.au Louise Warwick-Booth, Ruth Cross & Diane Lowcock 2012 Contemporary health […]

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Sexually transmitted fandom? Why women really follow AFL

Kim Toffoletti, Deakin University And so, we’re off! Last night the Australian Football League (AFL) season began. It’s a time for reclaiming footy scarves from the back of the wardrobe, scheduling home games into the calendar and entering the work footy-tipping competition. Research has demonstrated that male sport fans think women are less dedicated and […]

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Beyond metadata: the brave new world of big data retention

Ashlin Lee, University of Tasmania With the Senate passing the Federal Government’s data retention bill last week, there has been a great deal of discussion of “metadata”, what it is and whether the government ought to have access to it. However, metadata is just the tip of the data iceberg. The debate about data retention […]

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Managing and materialising data as part of self-tracking

Deborah Lupton, a Centenary Research Professor at the University of Canberra Like many other forms of digital data, self-tracking data have a vitality and social life of their own, circulating across and between a multitude of sites. In a context in which digital data are culturally represented as liquid entities that require management and containment, […]

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Rising jobless rate means young workers lose in penalty rates deal

Dan Woodman, University of Melbourne A new agreement in South Australia has opened the door for the reduction and even removal of penalty rates in the retail sector. Heralded on the front page of The Australian newspaper as “historic”, the deal is being viewed as a potential game changer in what industry groups like Restaurant […]

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Explainer: why do Australians have private health insurance?

Sophie Lewis, University of Sydney; Karen Willis, Australian Catholic University, and Marika Franklin, University of Sydney All Australian residents have access to Medicare, so why do half the population also decide to take out private health insurance? And what do they get out of it? The biggest users of private health insurance hospital benefits are […]

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March Nexus 26:1

Editors: Sue Malta & Christopher Baker In line with our personal vision to highlight the diversity of sociological endeavour in Australia, in this edition of Nexus we again seek to provide a glimpse into the array of research issues and researchers that TASA members are engaging with as this, the 21st century, gathers momentum. You […]

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A whacking stick is not enough to get young people into work

Kristy Muir; Abigail Powell, and Rose Butler Australia’s young people are facing some urgent problems. The unemployment rate of 15 to 24-year-olds, at a staggering 13.9%, is more than double the overall national rate of 6.3%. It hasn’t been higher since the late 1990s. The government has said time and again that we need to […]

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Don’t be surprised by Abbott’s comments about ‘lifestyle choices’

Christopher Mayes, University of Sydney and Jenny Kaldor, University of Sydney Prime Minister Tony Abbott’s claim this week that people living in remote communities were making a “lifestyle choice” that taxpayers shouldn’t be obliged to fund was not just the result of an unguarded moment. Rather, the phrase reveals an underlying view that social circumstances […]

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The tenuous link between population and prosperity

By Katharine Betts, Swinburne University of Technology The Intergenerational Report released last week by Treasurer Joe Hockey proposes extremely high rates of immigration, adding nearly 13 million people by 2054-55 above the numbers foreshadowed by natural increase. The report claims such an increase will offset demographic ageing and boost economic growth, but neither claim is […]

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The IGR focuses on the old, when the future belongs to the young

By Brendan Churchill, University of Tasmania and Lisa Denny, University of Tasmania Releasing Australia’s fourth Intergenerational Report, Joe Hockey described it as the “social compact between generations”, which would help “identify where the future opportunities will be” and “unlock the immense potential of our future”. According to the Treasurer, these opportunities are to be found […]

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Changing representations of self-tracking

By Deborah Lupton I recently completed a chapter for a book on lifelogging that discussed the concepts and uses of data as they are expressed in representations of self-tracking (see here for the full paper, available open access). In part of the chapter I looked at the ways in which people writing about the quantified […]

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The real message of the Intergenerational Report should be: we won’t be worse off

By Ben Spies-Butcher Today treasurer Joe Hockey will release the fourth Intergenerational Report. Like its predecessors, the government is likely to use the IGR to frame its economic and budget message. What past experience tells us is that behind the messaging, the numbers tell a consistent, and surprisingly optimistic, story. Whatever today’s headlines, remember to […]

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Rethinking Neoliberalism

In his article Rethinking neoliberalism Mitchell Dean states that “There are many key questions concerning the current status of the notion of neoliberalism”. You can listen to Mitchell discussing his article here.

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Women’s personal experiences of violence should indeed incite Fury

By Anastasia Powell, RMIT University Women sharing their accounts of violence against them, and its aftermath, can be powerful. Feminism has long since taught us that personal experiences of violence, when shared collectively, can transcend the level of individual harms and form the basis for understanding the political significance of these accounts. And, according to […]

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Australia’s summer of sporting events – has it been worth it?

By David Rowe, University of Western Sydney The cricket World Cup’s opening game, which pits Australia against England on Valentine’s Day, is the latest twist in a summer in which Australia has played host to two of the world’s biggest sporting events. Football’s Asian Cup and cricket’s World Cup have brought representative teams of 27 […]

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Australia is in the Eurovision – please adjust your maps

By Catherine Strong, RMIT University; Ben Wellings, Monash University, and Shanti Sumartojo, RMIT University Yesterday, it was announced that for the first time, Australia would be given a competitive place in the Eurovision Song Contest. Not only this, but Australians can also vote (and let’s not overlook the financial lure this would have provided the […]

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Women, work and the art of juggling time

Dr Sheree Gregory, University of Western Sydney One day in 2006, I sat at a kitchen table in a well-kept house of a well-off neighbourhood in Melbourne with Anna (not her real name), then a mother returning to paid work after the birth of her second child. I asked her how she intended to return […]

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Logging out? Why young people love to hate Facebook

By Brady Robards, University of Tasmania and Ariadne Vromen, University of Sydney Researchers, journalists writing about research, and young people themselves have been writing about the perceived decline of Facebook for a while now. Young people are leaving Facebook in droves; Facebook is no longer hip with the kids; Facebook is dead. As 19-year-old Andrew […]

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‘Cultures of Authenticity’ Symposium

By Claire Baker, PhD candidate at the University of New England The difficulties involved in pinning down exactly what is meant by ‘authenticity’ was evident in the different approaches taken by each of the speakers at the Cultural Sociology Thematic group’s Cultures of Authenticity Symposium held on 28 November, 2014. The day presented a fascinating […]

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Targeting casual sexism one hashtag at a time

Julia Coffey – University of Newcastle Another day, another example of sexism in the media. It seems barely a day goes by without some new example of a professional woman in the public sphere being asked the sort of question that would never be asked of her male counterpart. Take for example Amal Alamuddin, human […]

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Unintended Consequences

Raewyn Connell Meeting Sociology I can’t recall when I first heard the word ‘sociology’ but I remember how I first met a sociologist. I believe it was in winter 1964, though it might have been 1965. I was an honours History student at Melbourne, in the days when pass and honours students were segregated from […]

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Journal of Sociology 50th Anniversary E-Special

Edited by Alphia Possamai-Inesedy This E-Special is a celebration of both the Journal of Sociology and The Australian Sociological Association’s (TASA) 50th anniversary. This special issue provides the platform to examine the making of Australian sociology and the place of the Journal in the global sociological dialogue.  Access the E-Special here.

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Young Men, MDMA and Drug Education

By Adrian Farrugia: PhD candidate, National Drug Research Institute, Curtin University, Melbourne Researcher profile Young men’s drug consumption causes great societal concern. Drug education is one current strategy used in Australia for reducing harm, traditionally conceptualised as drug related, among young people (National Drug Strategy 2010–2015, 2011). Like harm reduction drug policy generally, harm reduction drug […]

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Theorising Vulnerability and Resilience in Relation to Young People’s Music-Making Practices.

By Michael Hartup, PhD candidate, University of Western Sydney and the Young and Well CRC Youth music-making initiatives are commonly founded on a linear, reductive model that suggests that by engaging in creative music practices vulnerable young people can develop resilience. This vulnerability-creativity-resilience model is built upon the notion that through musical creativity (often aided […]

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Deploying ICT-based resources for LGBT Young People in Asia

Benjamin Hanckel In October 2014 Singapore’s highest court upheld colonial law 377(a). The law is part of the penal code that criminalises sex between men. Similar legislation remains in other parts of Asia, such as Bhutan, Brunei, Malaysia, India and Indonesia, where engaging in same-sex activity can lead to imprisonment, being publicly whipped or being […]

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2014 JoS Best Paper Winner

Gerard Delanty was awarded the JoS Best Paper Award in 2014 for his article The prospects of cosmopolitanism and the possibility of global justice. You can listen to Gerard’s podcast about his article by clicking on the play arrow icon below:  

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Welcome

Welcome to the new TASA website! The previous website was launched in February 2011 – not long ago but a long time in digital years. Technical issues made it crucial that TASA invest in a new platform which could be more easily and cost effectively maintained. So after much deliberation and a few false starts […]

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The Future Workforce of Australian Social Science: Two-day Workshop

Nexus 26:3 published November 14, 2014 Karen Soldatic, Director of Teaching, Centre for Social Impact, UNSW TASA Post Grad Representative (2013-2014) On Thursday 24 and Friday 25 July, TASA hosted a two-day national workshop to give air to critical issues emerging for the social sciences and the impact these are having, and will have, for […]

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Introductory Presentation to the Social Science Workshop: Intellectual workforce and social science

Raewyn Connell, University of Sydney Social scientists are part of a distinctive workforce. We are knowledge workers, intellectually-trained workers, part of a significant sector of contemporary economies – about which there has been a great deal of debate. To summarize drastically, the sociology of intellectuals has documented the class position, the institutional life, and the […]

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Panel 1: The role of social scientists in understanding Australia’s changing landscape

Marian Simms, Executive Director, Australian Research Council Iain Walker: Former A/Program Leader, Social & Economic Sciences, CSIRO Kath Gelber, University of Queensland The panellists were Professor Marian Simms, Executive Director at the Australian Research Council, Dr Iain Walker, former Program Leader of Social and Economic Sciences at the CSIRO, and Professor Kath Gelber, former President […]

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Panel 2: Producing Australia’s social science future workforce and challenges ahead

Steven Schwartz, CEO, Council for the Humanities, Arts and Social Science Jeannie Rea, National President, National Tertiary Education Union Jane Kenway, ARC Professorial Fellow, Monash University The panel, introduced by TASA’s President, Jo Lindsay, provided a diverse range of views, beginning with a presentation by Steven Schwartz, CEO of CHASS, followed by NTEU President Jeannie […]

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Panel 3: Understanding the needs of Early Career Researchers

Nick Osbaldiston, Federation University Theresa Petray, James Cook University Kirsten Harley University of Sydney and Karen Soldatic, University of New South Wales The needs of Early Career Researchers/Academics (ECRs) in the sphere of universities occupies the minds of many of TASA’s members. Given that a decent majority of the membership are ECRs or MCRs (mid-career […]

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Panel 4: Can social scientists tackle our most intractable social problems?

Kristy Muir, Research Director (Social Outcomes) at the Centre for Social Impact at the University of New South Wales. Panel 4 consisted of presentations by representatives of key policy institutes, Dr Peter Harper, Deputy, Population, Labour, Social Statistics Group at the Australian Bureau of Statistics, Dr David Kalisch, Head, Director, Australian Institute of Health & […]

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Panel 5: The future of social scientists in the third sector

Naomi Berman, Former Research/Policy Manager, Foundations for Young Australians Dina Bowman, Research Manager, Brotherhood of St Laurence Sue Malta, Research Fellow/Project Coordinator, National Ageing Research Institute Professor Jane Kenway, ARC Professorial Fellow at Monash, introduced the panel and emphasised how the third sector has had an increased part to play in Australian social welfare and […]

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Health Sociology Review

The Health Sociology Review is one of two official, peer-reviewed academic journals of The Australian Sociological Association (TASA).  The journal is published and owned by Taylor & Francis (print ISSN 1446-1242 and online ISSN 1839-3551).  A new editorial team was appointed in late 2014 for the period 2015 – 2018. Joint Editors in Chief, Dr […]

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Welcome

Journal of Sociology is the official journal of The Australian Sociological Association. It carries peer refereed articles of sociological research and theory on issues of interest to Australian sociology and aims to promote dialogue and exchange between Australian sociologists and the international community of sociology. The journal is a Sage publication and the current Editor-in-Chief is TASA […]

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