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A ‘febrile culture’: the sociology of #libspill

Mark Bahnisch writes: It’s interesting to consider the phrase ‘politics junkies’. While there is a view that we somehow live in a post-political age and a related claim that at the end of history all we see is the routine administration of people and things, it would be hard to sustain these in light of […]

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Response to Erik Olin Wright on Challenging Capitalism I

Yesterday, this blog noted the recent E. L. Wheelwright Memorial Lecture delivered in Sydney on 5 August by Professor Erik Olin Wright. The first of the promised responses to Wright follows. Ben Spies-Butcher writes: Retiring to Hermann’s Bar, across City Rd from where Erik Olin-Wright had just delivered the 2015 Wheelwright Lecture, the place was […]

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Erik Olin Wright on the sociology of real utopias in Sydney

Mark Bahnisch writes: Past American Sociology Association President and scholar of real utopias Professor Erik Olin Wright recently visited Sydney, spending time at The University of Sydney, Macquarie University and UNSW. Wright was generous with his time, and as a sometime student of utopias, I was happy to be able to attend two of the […]

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Career building, neo-liberal subjectification and the Academy

Fabian Cannizzo writes: Career building is a fundamentally imaginative activity. In envisioning how our lives and working circumstances might be projected into the future, career-seeking individuals engage in conceptual mapping. Our career imaginations are influenced by personal values, perceptions of ourselves and environments, our relationships both in the workplace and beyond, and any number of […]

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Identity Studies

Identity Studies – Key Books from Routledge Routledge is pleased to present a range of books on Identity Studies. Check them out here!

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Social stability is the missing link underpinning economic growth

Eva Cox, University of Technology Sydney, Keynote speaker at TASA 2015 Can governments plan Australia’s future just by improving selected economic indicators? Will a focus on creating more jobs, cutting taxes and growing GDP be enough to ensure well-being? These are the core agenda items being pushed by the Abbott government. Yet they may prove […]

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Gender Studies

   Gender Studies – Key Books from Routledge          Routledge is pleased to present a range of books on Gender Studies. Check them out here!

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work life balance

Academic Work/Life Balance: Challenges for Theory and Practice

Nick Osbaldiston & Fabian Cannizzo Re-Examining Academic Work/Life in Neoliberal Times In our forthcoming article in the Journal of Sociology, ‘Academic Work/Life Balance: A Brief Quantitative Analysis of the Australian Experience’, we explore how academic staff experience work/life balance, finding that the concept of ‘life’ within the work/life dichotomy has often assumed characteristics. The distinction […]

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Blogging @ TASA

I’m delighted to announce that I’ve recently been appointed TASA Blog Editor by the Executive. I founded one of Australia’s leading political and social affairs blogs, Larvatus Prodeo, and edited it for many years. For a range of interesting reasons (about which I may write some day), blogging on politics, society and economics in Australia […]

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Fat, Food & the Body

           Fat, Food & the Body   Routledge is pleased to present a range of books on Fat, Food and the Body.                 Check them out here!

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Economic Sociology: State of Play and Fault Lines for Future Research

Economic Sociology Forum – Thursday 23rd July, University of Sydney Anoushka Benbow-Buitenhuis, RMIT University Since the 2008 Global Financial Crisis, mainstream neoclassical economics as the dominating discourse has been challenged across the social and economic sciences. Influential works by economists Thomas Piketty and Joseph Stiglitz have enjoyed commercial success and helped to legitimize discussion about […]

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Emotions at work: Identity, self and society

The 4th Sociology of Emotions and Affect Workshop: Emotions at work: Identity, self and society Susan Banks, University of Tasmania, recipient of the thematic group bursary to attend this event My work is focused on emotions, work and identity. How do people involved in aged care and disability support experience and understand care? What happens to meaning […]

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Test scores aren’t good quality indicators for schools or students

Jennifer Chesters, University of Canberra In a new research paper, prominent education researcher John Hattie suggests current education policies aren’t improving our place in world education rankings because we are appealing to what parents want rather than doing what we know works in education. He identifies five “distractions” we tend to focus on that have […]

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Speaking with: Hazel Easthope on designing for high density living

Dallas Rogers, University of Western Sydney Australia’s growing population has put enormous pressure on the housing market within the major cities, which have expanded further and further out. But new settlements on the urban fringe require governments to invest in costly new infrastructure, and states such as Victoria and New South Wales have started to […]

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Identity, Neoliberalism and Aspiration: Educating White Working-class Boys

Examining the learner identities of white working-class boys in the United Kingdom By Garth Stahl In the United Kingdom, it is widely documented, both in academic circles and in the popular press, that white working-class children consistently underperform at school. Today this ethnic group is considered to be one of the lowest performing in terms […]

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Rethinking elements of informed consent for living kidney donation: Findings from a New Zealand study

Rhonda Shaw, Victoria University of Wellington Although healthcare professionals (HCPs) and bioethicists appear to dominate discussion around kidney transplantation, sociologists began researching this field over four decades ago. The ethical issues they raised remain salient today. Live kidney transplantation is increasingly offered as an alternative treatment modality for end-stage renal failure, due to its benefits […]

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No means no: how resistance training for women can stop (some) rape

Anastasia Powell, RMIT University A Canadian study has found that university women participating in a rape-prevention program involving “resistance training” were significantly less likely to be sexually assaulted in the next year. In their New England Journal of Medicine article, Professor Charlene Senn and her colleagues report that their program reduced women’s risk of rape […]

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The slow politics of dignity for the aged and dying in Australia

Gary Wickham, Murdoch University Dignity is crucial to the proper operation of rights. If rights are to do what they are meant to do, they need to be deeply embedded in a country’s society and culture. It’s not enough just to have rights sitting on the books. The overwhelming majority of people in the country […]

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‘Separate worlds: A discourse analysis of mainstream and Aboriginal populist…’

Separate worlds: A discourse analysis of mainstream and Aboriginal populist media accounts of the Northern Territory Emergency Response in 2007 Fiona Proudfoot, School of Social Sciences, University of Tasmania, Australia Daphne Habibis, School of Social Sciences, University of Tasmania, Australia In our  article ‘Separate worlds: A discourse analysis of mainstream and Aboriginal populist media accounts of the […]

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Religion, aesthetics and moral ontology

Ezzy, D. (2014). Religion, aesthetics and moral ontology. Journal of Sociology. Modernity has failed to develop an adequate institutionalised framework to manage emotions. Cognitively oriented beliefs seem inadequate to this task. However strong our will, we cannot tell ourselves to feel differently. The religious practices that in the past were central to the management of […]

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Celebrating Oliver Sacks’ romantic science and a life now ending

Matthew Wade, Australian National University In the preface to The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat (1998), popular neurologist Oliver Sacks outlines the rationale behind his brand of “romantic science”. Borrowed from friend and mentor AR Luria, the term describes a literary form operating “at the intersection of fact and fable”. With this […]

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More than a fashion choice: the everyday aesthetics of tattooing

Eduardo de la Fuente, James Cook University According to the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, 22% of Australian men and 29% of women aged 20 to 29 have at least one tattoo. In a 2013 survey conducted by Sydney-based McCrindle Research, a third of people with tattoos regretted them to some extent, and […]

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What kind of government service puts public on hold for 811 years?

Kristin Natalier, Flinders University A new report by the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) calculates around one in four calls to Centrelink went unanswered in 2013-14. The ANAO estimates the time lost by customers who abandoned their calls – after an average wait of nine minutes and 43 seconds – totalled 143 years. The average wait […]

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Male Sex Work and Society

Male Sex Work and Society edited By Victor Minichiello and John Scott Published by Harington Park Press The first comprehensive interdisciplinary volume devoted to male sex work. Dean and Andrew speak to the co-editor of the much anticipated “Male Sex Work and Society” – an academic look at male sex workers around the globe. Is […]

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Without affordable housing, we won’t have a society worth living in

Peter Walters, The University of Queensland Home ownership, the Australian Dream, is becoming a fading hope for those without an existing foothold in the market. For increasing numbers of younger Australians, the dream will give way to a future as tenants. This will have far-reaching negative impacts on how people live together in both the […]

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Doing justice to disability: the upside of TEDx’s Stella bungle

Gerard Goggin, University of Sydney and Katie Ellis, Curtin University We’ve made real progress in embracing disability as part of everyday life in Australia. But there’s a fair way to go, as the TEDx Sydney missed opportunity showed last week. With much fanfare, TEDx launched #stellaschallenge, to kickstart conversations and transform disability through campaigns and […]

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‘It’s our lot’: how resilience influences the experience of depression in women with urinary incontinence

Dr Jodie Avery It seems understandable that when faced with a chronic condition such as Urinary Incontinence, women are more likely to experience depression.  The symptoms, burden and costs to women are a constant presence in their daily lives.  Incontinence can be embarrassing and frustrating, and can limit socialising, working and exercise.  Previously we found […]

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Why Aboriginal people need autonomy over their food supply

Karen Soldatic, UNSW Australia and Kim Spurway, UNSW Australia Access to affordable and nutritious food is an ongoing problem in remote Indigenous communities. These areas have an artificially inflated cost of living due to cycles of mining boom and bust, and suffer from a general unavailability of fresh fruit and vegetables and other high-quality foods. […]

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#budget2015 In the new welfare state, PPL and Childcare are for workers – not women, not children, not families

By Assoc. Prof. Kristin Natalier (Flinders), cross-posted from Social Democratic Directions The winners and losers of the proposed PPL and child-care policies have become a defining theme of the post-Budget commentary. But calculating winners and losers with reference to what was previously promised compartmentalises the challenges of work and family from the broader economic and political […]

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‘Looks Good on Your CV’: The sociology of voluntourism recruitment in higher education

Colleen McGloin (University of Wollongong) Nichole Georgeou (Australian Catholic University) Australian Universities encourage private companies to recruit tertiary students to ‘volunteer’ in developing countries through short-term adventure travel. The companies that organise these travel tours are based in the global North and they claim that volunteering increases student employment prospects by demonstrating civic engagement. Marketed as ‘development […]

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Change to conference papers – refereed papers restricted to postgraduate students

The role of refereed full papers for conferences has been under debate in many universities in light of the Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) exercise. The ERA system disadvantages disciplines within a university that have a high proportion of conference papers among their outputs. The TASA executive has been receiving reports that universities are now […]

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Missed opportunities on coherent pension policy reform

Hal Kendig, Australian National University and Andrew Podger, Australian National University Changes to the pension foreshadowed by Social Services Minister Scott Morrison have been enacted as a flagship policy of the 2015-2016 federal budget. Mr Morrison has said the changes, which still need the support of the Senate cross-benchers to become policy will allow more […]

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The value of health: TASA Health Symposium 2014

Caragh Brosnan, University of Newcastle Emma Kirby, University of Queensland Co-Convenors, Health Thematic Group The Health Thematic Group held a one-day symposium at the University of South Australia on 28 November 2014, called ‘The value of health: the refiguring of health and health care under neoliberalism’. The symposium drew on one of the key themes […]

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Surprising perspectives? Palestinian refugees and the right of return?

Sobhi Albadawi, PhD candidate, Macquarie University My name is Sobhi Albadawi; I was born in the Al’Arroub refugee camp located in Hebron Governorate in the southern part of the West Bank. The camp was established by the United Nation Relief Works Agency (UNRWA) in 1949 when Palestinians were forced to leave their original villages by Jewish […]

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Researchers must do more to arrest the poor Aboriginal human condition

Dr Lester-Irabinna Rigney PhD, Professor and Dean Indigenous Education, The University Adelaide. This week some big name thinkers spoke in Adelaide on the urgent need to bring change to the poor conditions of Aboriginal peoples and to stop violence against women. At the White Ribbon Day breakfast, Lieutenant General David Morrison AO issued an urgent “call to […]

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Struggle Street is poverty porn with an extra dose of class racism

Steven Threadgold, University of Newcastle In case you hadn’t noticed, poverty is entertaining. “Poverty porn” refers to both Westerners’ portrayal of global inequality, disease and hunger and also to the distorted presentation of disadvantage by the advantaged. Like mainstream sexual porn that produces sexualised images from the male gaze for male gratification, poverty porn produces […]

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Call for Expressions of Interest – Nexus Editorial Team

TASA Executive seeks to appoint a new editorial team for the Association’s newsletter, Nexus, for the two-year term 2016–2017. Applicants must be TASA members and ideally should be teaching sociology and/or publishing sociological research. Applications may be from a single organisational unit or be cross-institutional. The option of a small allowance or complimentary TASA membership […]

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Call for Expressions of Interest – TASA Blog Editor

As the new TASA website allows for more functions and more opportunities for members to write or cross-post blog entries, we are seeking a volunteer to act as the TASA Blog Editor. The person in this role would work with the Multimedia Portfolio Leader, the Executive Officer, the Editors of Nexus and the Editors-in-Chief of […]

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Belle Gibson shows that most of us care about right and wrong

Nicholas Hookway, University of Tasmania With her lies about having cancer and her willingness to cash in on the hopes of actual cancer patients, Belle Gibson – the Australian woman behind The Whole Pantry app – is indicative of our run-down, self-indulgent and narcissistic moral world, right? From an insatiable desire for fame and attention […]

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State of imprisonment: Tasmania escapes ‘law and order’ infection

Rob White, University of Tasmania This article is part of The Conversation’s series, State of Imprisonment, which provides snapshots of imprisonment trends in each state and territory. The intention is to provide a basis for informed public discussion of imprisonment policies and of the costs and consequences for Australia of rising rates of incarceration. Imprisonment […]

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Sociology of bio-knowledge at the limits of life

Alan Petersen, Monash University & Emma Kowal, Deakin University Journal Introduction Sociology has long had a fraught relationship with biomedicine, biotechnology and the biological sciences – a trio of fields that produce what Petersen has termed ‘bio-knowledge’. This relationship can be traced to the source of the discipline, as sociology’s professional identity has been shaped, […]

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China’s growing labour movement offers hope for workers globally

Tom Barnes, Australian Catholic University and Kevin Lin, University of Technology, Sydney The growing labour movement in China, as fragmented and repressed as it is, offers hope for workers everywhere as an example of organising and protecting themselves against incredible odds. Independent labour organising and independent trade unions are banned and workers do not have […]

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Cricket, commentary and the dollar: Benaud’s legacy is complex

David Rowe, University of Western Sydney Around 150,000 deaths are registered in Australia every year, but few receive the “end of an era” tribute accorded Richie Benaud. He was with us as a player, journalist, author, consultant and commentator for so long that he witnessed the cricket order passing from neo-feudal to hyper-capitalist. He played […]

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‘Cultures of Authenticity’ Symposium

Claire Baker PhD candidate, University of New England ‘Authenticity’ is a central idea in late-modern culture. To interrogate its contemporary meanings and applications, the Cultural Sociology Thematic Group organised the Cultures of Authenticity symposium at Flinders University city campus in Adelaide on 28 November 2014. The symposium was organised by the group conveners Dr Nicholas […]

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The Invisibility of Male Victims of Human Trafficking

Polina Smiragina, Postgraduate Researcher, The University of Sydney The human trafficking discourse has been on the human rights agenda for quite some time. This has culminated in progressive research that has initiated the development and implementation of policies, instruments and projects aimed at addressing the harms that accompany violations to individual rights. It has also […]

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Cynical Sociology? No, Kynical Sociology!

David Inglis, University of Exeter It is often said that sociology is a cynical exercise. It looks at the world in a corrosive way. It reveals the nature of mystifications and things presented as real and apparently obdurate, which it shows to be in fact social constructions and ideological elaborations. It sees through appearances and […]

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The Anzacs and National Identity

The traditions associated with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps soldiers – Anzacs – comprise an important element of the Australian narrative. Our paper published by the Journal of Sociology examines the influence of Anzacs upon contemporary Australian identity. The Australian Imperial Force (AIF) volunteer – ‘citizen soldiers’ – at Gallipoli were later combined with […]

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How to engage youth in making policies that work for us all

Philippa Collin, University of Western Sydney National Youth Week is an opportunity to celebrate young people and their contribution to society. But the nature – and future – of this contribution has never been more uncertain as reforms for work, welfare, education and health are being explored in light of recent or anticipated reviews, including […]

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Breaking up is hard to do: how the ALP can differ from the Greens

Gary Wickham, Murdoch University It’s both heartening and perplexing to read in the press about the ALP’s increasing determination, in the wake of the NSW election result, to make clear to voters that Labor is not allied to the Greens. It’s heartening because it has become obvious since its 2010-13 “fling” with the Greens that […]

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Book Review Invitation – HSR

The Editors of Health Sociology Review invite reviews of the following books. Accepted reviews will be published in the journal and reviewers get to keep a copy of the book.  If you would like to enquire about reviewing a book please contact Dr Sarah MacLean on (03) 90353114, or smaclean@unimelb.edu.au Louise Warwick-Booth, Ruth Cross & Diane Lowcock 2012 Contemporary health […]

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Sexually transmitted fandom? Why women really follow AFL

Kim Toffoletti, Deakin University And so, we’re off! Last night the Australian Football League (AFL) season began. It’s a time for reclaiming footy scarves from the back of the wardrobe, scheduling home games into the calendar and entering the work footy-tipping competition. Research has demonstrated that male sport fans think women are less dedicated and […]

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Beyond metadata: the brave new world of big data retention

Ashlin Lee, University of Tasmania With the Senate passing the Federal Government’s data retention bill last week, there has been a great deal of discussion of “metadata”, what it is and whether the government ought to have access to it. However, metadata is just the tip of the data iceberg. The debate about data retention […]

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Managing and materialising data as part of self-tracking

Deborah Lupton, a Centenary Research Professor at the University of Canberra Like many other forms of digital data, self-tracking data have a vitality and social life of their own, circulating across and between a multitude of sites. In a context in which digital data are culturally represented as liquid entities that require management and containment, […]

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Rising jobless rate means young workers lose in penalty rates deal

Dan Woodman, University of Melbourne A new agreement in South Australia has opened the door for the reduction and even removal of penalty rates in the retail sector. Heralded on the front page of The Australian newspaper as “historic”, the deal is being viewed as a potential game changer in what industry groups like Restaurant […]

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Explainer: why do Australians have private health insurance?

Sophie Lewis, University of Sydney; Karen Willis, Australian Catholic University, and Marika Franklin, University of Sydney All Australian residents have access to Medicare, so why do half the population also decide to take out private health insurance? And what do they get out of it? The biggest users of private health insurance hospital benefits are […]

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March Nexus 26:1

Editors: Sue Malta & Christopher Baker In line with our personal vision to highlight the diversity of sociological endeavour in Australia, in this edition of Nexus we again seek to provide a glimpse into the array of research issues and researchers that TASA members are engaging with as this, the 21st century, gathers momentum. You […]

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A whacking stick is not enough to get young people into work

Kristy Muir; Abigail Powell, and Rose Butler Australia’s young people are facing some urgent problems. The unemployment rate of 15 to 24-year-olds, at a staggering 13.9%, is more than double the overall national rate of 6.3%. It hasn’t been higher since the late 1990s. The government has said time and again that we need to […]

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Don’t be surprised by Abbott’s comments about ‘lifestyle choices’

Christopher Mayes, University of Sydney and Jenny Kaldor, University of Sydney Prime Minister Tony Abbott’s claim this week that people living in remote communities were making a “lifestyle choice” that taxpayers shouldn’t be obliged to fund was not just the result of an unguarded moment. Rather, the phrase reveals an underlying view that social circumstances […]

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The tenuous link between population and prosperity

By Katharine Betts, Swinburne University of Technology The Intergenerational Report released last week by Treasurer Joe Hockey proposes extremely high rates of immigration, adding nearly 13 million people by 2054-55 above the numbers foreshadowed by natural increase. The report claims such an increase will offset demographic ageing and boost economic growth, but neither claim is […]

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The IGR focuses on the old, when the future belongs to the young

By Brendan Churchill, University of Tasmania and Lisa Denny, University of Tasmania Releasing Australia’s fourth Intergenerational Report, Joe Hockey described it as the “social compact between generations”, which would help “identify where the future opportunities will be” and “unlock the immense potential of our future”. According to the Treasurer, these opportunities are to be found […]

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Changing representations of self-tracking

By Deborah Lupton I recently completed a chapter for a book on lifelogging that discussed the concepts and uses of data as they are expressed in representations of self-tracking (see here for the full paper, available open access). In part of the chapter I looked at the ways in which people writing about the quantified […]

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The real message of the Intergenerational Report should be: we won’t be worse off

By Ben Spies-Butcher Today treasurer Joe Hockey will release the fourth Intergenerational Report. Like its predecessors, the government is likely to use the IGR to frame its economic and budget message. What past experience tells us is that behind the messaging, the numbers tell a consistent, and surprisingly optimistic, story. Whatever today’s headlines, remember to […]

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Rethinking Neoliberalism

In his article Rethinking neoliberalism Mitchell Dean states that “There are many key questions concerning the current status of the notion of neoliberalism”. You can listen to Mitchell discussing his article here.

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Women’s personal experiences of violence should indeed incite Fury

By Anastasia Powell, RMIT University Women sharing their accounts of violence against them, and its aftermath, can be powerful. Feminism has long since taught us that personal experiences of violence, when shared collectively, can transcend the level of individual harms and form the basis for understanding the political significance of these accounts. And, according to […]

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Australia’s summer of sporting events – has it been worth it?

By David Rowe, University of Western Sydney The cricket World Cup’s opening game, which pits Australia against England on Valentine’s Day, is the latest twist in a summer in which Australia has played host to two of the world’s biggest sporting events. Football’s Asian Cup and cricket’s World Cup have brought representative teams of 27 […]

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Australia is in the Eurovision – please adjust your maps

By Catherine Strong, RMIT University; Ben Wellings, Monash University, and Shanti Sumartojo, RMIT University Yesterday, it was announced that for the first time, Australia would be given a competitive place in the Eurovision Song Contest. Not only this, but Australians can also vote (and let’s not overlook the financial lure this would have provided the […]

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Women, work and the art of juggling time

Dr Sheree Gregory, University of Western Sydney One day in 2006, I sat at a kitchen table in a well-kept house of a well-off neighbourhood in Melbourne with Anna (not her real name), then a mother returning to paid work after the birth of her second child. I asked her how she intended to return […]

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Logging out? Why young people love to hate Facebook

By Brady Robards, University of Tasmania and Ariadne Vromen, University of Sydney Researchers, journalists writing about research, and young people themselves have been writing about the perceived decline of Facebook for a while now. Young people are leaving Facebook in droves; Facebook is no longer hip with the kids; Facebook is dead. As 19-year-old Andrew […]

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‘Cultures of Authenticity’ Symposium

By Claire Baker, PhD candidate at the University of New England The difficulties involved in pinning down exactly what is meant by ‘authenticity’ was evident in the different approaches taken by each of the speakers at the Cultural Sociology Thematic group’s Cultures of Authenticity Symposium held on 28 November, 2014. The day presented a fascinating […]

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Targeting casual sexism one hashtag at a time

Julia Coffey – University of Newcastle Another day, another example of sexism in the media. It seems barely a day goes by without some new example of a professional woman in the public sphere being asked the sort of question that would never be asked of her male counterpart. Take for example Amal Alamuddin, human […]

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Unintended Consequences

Raewyn Connell Meeting Sociology I can’t recall when I first heard the word ‘sociology’ but I remember how I first met a sociologist. I believe it was in winter 1964, though it might have been 1965. I was an honours History student at Melbourne, in the days when pass and honours students were segregated from […]

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Journal of Sociology 50th Anniversary E-Special

Edited by Alphia Possamai-Inesedy This E-Special is a celebration of both the Journal of Sociology and The Australian Sociological Association’s (TASA) 50th anniversary. This special issue provides the platform to examine the making of Australian sociology and the place of the Journal in the global sociological dialogue.  Access the E-Special here.

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Young Men, MDMA and Drug Education

By Adrian Farrugia: PhD candidate, National Drug Research Institute, Curtin University, Melbourne Researcher profile Young men’s drug consumption causes great societal concern. Drug education is one current strategy used in Australia for reducing harm, traditionally conceptualised as drug related, among young people (National Drug Strategy 2010–2015, 2011). Like harm reduction drug policy generally, harm reduction drug […]

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Theorising Vulnerability and Resilience in Relation to Young People’s Music-Making Practices.

By Michael Hartup, PhD candidate, University of Western Sydney and the Young and Well CRC Youth music-making initiatives are commonly founded on a linear, reductive model that suggests that by engaging in creative music practices vulnerable young people can develop resilience. This vulnerability-creativity-resilience model is built upon the notion that through musical creativity (often aided […]

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Deploying ICT-based resources for LGBT Young People in Asia

Benjamin Hanckel In October 2014 Singapore’s highest court upheld colonial law 377(a). The law is part of the penal code that criminalises sex between men. Similar legislation remains in other parts of Asia, such as Bhutan, Brunei, Malaysia, India and Indonesia, where engaging in same-sex activity can lead to imprisonment, being publicly whipped or being […]

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2014 JoS Best Paper Winner

Gerard Delanty was awarded the JoS Best Paper Award in 2014 for his article The prospects of cosmopolitanism and the possibility of global justice. You can listen to Gerard’s podcast about his article by clicking on the play arrow icon below:  

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Welcome

Welcome to the new TASA website! The previous website was launched in February 2011 – not long ago but a long time in digital years. Technical issues made it crucial that TASA invest in a new platform which could be more easily and cost effectively maintained. So after much deliberation and a few false starts […]

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The Future Workforce of Australian Social Science: Two-day Workshop

Nexus 26:3 published November 14, 2014 Karen Soldatic, Director of Teaching, Centre for Social Impact, UNSW TASA Post Grad Representative (2013-2014) On Thursday 24 and Friday 25 July, TASA hosted a two-day national workshop to give air to critical issues emerging for the social sciences and the impact these are having, and will have, for […]

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Introductory Presentation to the Social Science Workshop: Intellectual workforce and social science

Raewyn Connell, University of Sydney Social scientists are part of a distinctive workforce. We are knowledge workers, intellectually-trained workers, part of a significant sector of contemporary economies – about which there has been a great deal of debate. To summarize drastically, the sociology of intellectuals has documented the class position, the institutional life, and the […]

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Panel 1: The role of social scientists in understanding Australia’s changing landscape

Marian Simms, Executive Director, Australian Research Council Iain Walker: Former A/Program Leader, Social & Economic Sciences, CSIRO Kath Gelber, University of Queensland The panellists were Professor Marian Simms, Executive Director at the Australian Research Council, Dr Iain Walker, former Program Leader of Social and Economic Sciences at the CSIRO, and Professor Kath Gelber, former President […]

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Panel 2: Producing Australia’s social science future workforce and challenges ahead

Steven Schwartz, CEO, Council for the Humanities, Arts and Social Science Jeannie Rea, National President, National Tertiary Education Union Jane Kenway, ARC Professorial Fellow, Monash University The panel, introduced by TASA’s President, Jo Lindsay, provided a diverse range of views, beginning with a presentation by Steven Schwartz, CEO of CHASS, followed by NTEU President Jeannie […]

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Panel 3: Understanding the needs of Early Career Researchers

Nick Osbaldiston, Federation University Theresa Petray, James Cook University Kirsten Harley University of Sydney and Karen Soldatic, University of New South Wales The needs of Early Career Researchers/Academics (ECRs) in the sphere of universities occupies the minds of many of TASA’s members. Given that a decent majority of the membership are ECRs or MCRs (mid-career […]

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Panel 4: Can social scientists tackle our most intractable social problems?

Kristy Muir, Research Director (Social Outcomes) at the Centre for Social Impact at the University of New South Wales. Panel 4 consisted of presentations by representatives of key policy institutes, Dr Peter Harper, Deputy, Population, Labour, Social Statistics Group at the Australian Bureau of Statistics, Dr David Kalisch, Head, Director, Australian Institute of Health & […]

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Panel 5: The future of social scientists in the third sector

Naomi Berman, Former Research/Policy Manager, Foundations for Young Australians Dina Bowman, Research Manager, Brotherhood of St Laurence Sue Malta, Research Fellow/Project Coordinator, National Ageing Research Institute Professor Jane Kenway, ARC Professorial Fellow at Monash, introduced the panel and emphasised how the third sector has had an increased part to play in Australian social welfare and […]

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Health Sociology Review

The Health Sociology Review is one of two official, peer-reviewed academic journals of The Australian Sociological Association (TASA).  The journal is published and owned by Taylor & Francis (print ISSN 1446-1242 and online ISSN 1839-3551).  A new editorial team was appointed in late 2014 for the period 2015 – 2018. Joint Editors in Chief, Dr […]

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Welcome

Journal of Sociology is the official journal of The Australian Sociological Association. It carries peer refereed articles of sociological research and theory on issues of interest to Australian sociology and aims to promote dialogue and exchange between Australian sociologists and the international community of sociology. The journal is a Sage publication and the current Editor-in-Chief is TASA […]

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